Huntington Attorney Admitted To Practice At Supreme Court

Huntington-based attorney Carol L. Schlitt, center, is pictured outside of the U.S. Supreme Court Building with her family, from left, Patrick Cronin, Mark X. Cronin and John Lee Cronin. On Tuesday, Schlitt was admitted to practice law at the Supreme Court, meaning she may now argue cases before it.

Huntington-based attorney Carol L. Schlitt, center, is pictured outside of the U.S. Supreme Court Building with her family, from left, Patrick Cronin, Mark X. Cronin and John Lee Cronin. On Tuesday, Schlitt was admitted to practice law at the Supreme Court, meaning she may now argue cases before it.

The U.S. Supreme Court welcomed a Huntington face on Tuesday.

Huntington-based personal injury and malpractice attorney Carol L. Schlitt has been admitted to practice law at the Supreme Court, meaning she may now argue cases before it. Less than 1 percent of all attorneys in the country are admitted to practice at the Supreme Court.

Schlitt, and a group of select New York lawyers, appeared before the justices of the Supreme Court in a formal ceremony during which they were introduced by New York-based attorney Jay Breakstone.

Chief Justice John Roberts welcomed Schlitt and the other lawyers before they took an oath. In the following reception, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg congratulated the attorneys on their accomplishment, and spoke of their common New York roots.

Schlitt called the entire experience both “a thrill and honor.”

To qualify for admission to the Bar of the Supreme Court, an applicant must have been admitted to practice in the highest court of their state for numerous years, and must have been admitted to a federal court. Each candidate must also be a member in good standing of their state bar and must be sponsored by two attorneys already admitted to the Supreme Court. Applicants must then be presented to the court by one attorney already admitted to the Supreme Court. 

Schlitt produced a certificate from the New York Court of Appeals, the highest court in New York, attesting to her admission to practice law in the state, and her good standing before the court. She was sponsored on the day of the ceremony by attorney Jay Breakstone.

“As a personal injury and medical malpractice attorney, I may never actually argue a case before the Supreme Court,” Schlitt said.

But, she continued, “To have earned admission to that Court is an honor I greatly value.”