Harborfields Teacher Aide Earns White House Honor

By Janee Law

jlaw@longislandergroup.com

Annie McClintock is pictured with her son Jamie McClintock at the School Support Champions of Change honoring ceremony in Washington, D.C. Photo by Harborfields Central School District

Annie McClintock is pictured with her son Jamie McClintock at the School Support Champions of Change honoring ceremony in Washington, D.C. Photo by Harborfields Central School District

Annie McClintock, a special education paraeducator at Harborfields High School, was among 12 school-related professionals to be honored by the White House in May as a School Support Champion of Change for her leadership and dedication to motivate students.

“To be among the 12 who were recognized out of the more than three million school support professionals in the nation, was humbling,” McClintock, of Northport, stated.

McClintock has a passion for volunteering and has coordinated volunteer efforts. She has participated in several food, winter clothing and backpack supply drives; the annual Breast Cancer Walk at Jones Beach; the annual Cross Bay Distant Memories Swim in Northport Bay; and many other community projects.

Over the past 15 years, she has collected and donated toys to the Congregational Church of Huntington, which then donates the toys to the annual Family Service League’s Holiday Boutique.

To be recognized for 50 years of committed service in the Harborfields community was an honor, McClintock stated.

Those who gave speeches acknowledging the ceremony recipients were Senior Advisor to the President Valerie Jarrett; Deputy Assistant to the President for Education Policy Roberto Rodriquez; and Monique Chism, deputy assistant secretary for the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.

McClintock received the honor at the White House in Washington, D.C., on May 11. She was accompanied by her son, Jamie, who is a Harborfields graduate. Honorees were selected by the White House for their devotion to ensure that students receive the support they need to succeed both inside and outside the classroom.

“School-related professionals are often the first person our students encounter in the morning and the last they see at the end of the day,” McClintock stated. “We will remain the backbone in our schools and community. We live where we work.”