Four Teens Earn Eagle Scout Rank

Joshua Kimmelstein, Thomas Kowalski, Tristan Delaney and Dylan Campbell take the pledge as they are inducted into the elite ranks of Eagle Scouts by Boy Scouts of America Suffolk County Council VP David Hunt.

Joshua Kimmelstein, Thomas Kowalski, Tristan Delaney and Dylan Campbell take the pledge as they are inducted into the elite ranks of Eagle Scouts by Boy Scouts of America Suffolk County Council VP David Hunt.

By Sophia Ricco
sricco@longislandergroup.com

Four scouts from Troop 106 of Huntington were recognized for earning their Eagle award, the highest rank in Boy Scouts.

A ceremony and reception held on Jan. 22 honored Dylan Campbell, Thomas Kowalski, Tristan Delaney and Joshua Kimelstein, who became numbers 94, 95, 96 and 97 to achieve Eagle in their troop’s 60-year-history.

Scouts in Troop 106 opened the ceremony with a candle lighting, called “The Trail to Eagle.” Following speeches by public officials, scout leaders and the inductees themselves on the road to becoming an Eagle, each of the boys presented “mentor pins” to those who helped them along the way:their fathers, and scoutmaster Mike Terrone.

In order to become an Eagle Scout, the scouts must rise through each rank: scout, tenderfoot, second class, first class, star, life and finally eagle. They are required to earn a minimum of 21 merit badges, 13 of which are specified, and must show leadership in their troop by holding various positions like a patrol leader, event organizer or instructor to younger scouts.

“The beauty of the boy scouts is they have a safe environment to really try and experiment in different leadership roles,” Kowalski said.

Eagle scout Dylan Campbell with his nephew, Tiger Cub Scout RJ Lahey from Pack 406 in Melville.

Eagle scout Dylan Campbell with his nephew, Tiger Cub Scout RJ Lahey from Pack 406 in Melville.

The final challenge is to complete an Eagle Service Project, where they lead others through helping an organization. Campbell built a new awards podium for his high school wrestling team, while Delaney constructed a mobile kiosk for Sweetbriar Wildlife Rehabilitation Center.

Once their proposal is approved by the Boys Scout’s Suffolk County Council, it is up to the scouts to fundraise for their project and enlist volunteers to make it happen. Kimelstein and Kowalski raised money through car washes, while the other scouts held pasta fundraisers. Each was able to take on the role of project manager as they led their teams to complete their plan.

“These particular boys have the drive, and that’s what the rank of eagle scout signifies,” Kowalski said. “The boys who want it, can earn it, they just have to have the desire to see the project through.”

The newest Eagle Scouts joined Troop 106 around the same time and were able to motivate each other as they saw one another rise in rank. Scout leaders, Terrone and Kowalski have been able to utilize their experience as Boy Scouts themselves to aid their scouts’ journeys.

“Our troop, in particular, is very focused on getting the boys there,” Kowalski said. “If the boys want to do it, myself, Mike Terrone and other scout leaders are there for them, to give them advice and guidance with executing the project.”