Renaissance Downtowns Needs Variances For Northridge Project

By Jano Tantongco

jtantongco@longislandergroup.com

Renaissance Downtowns’ Northridge Street development is depicted on a map next to one of the master developer’s other projects, Gateway Plaza, which is also being reviewed by the ZBA. Photo/Renaissance Downtowns

Renaissance Downtowns’ Northridge Street development is depicted on a map next to one of the master developer’s other projects, Gateway Plaza, which is also being reviewed by the ZBA. Photo/Renaissance Downtowns

Renaissance Downtowns has asked the Huntington Zoning Board of Appeals for nine different variances pertaining to the master developer’s planned Northridge Street development.

Similarly to their Gateway Plaza project, which is awaiting determination on variances requested by Renaissance last month, the proposed Northridge development would be mixed-use and feature 6,200 square feet of retail space on the first floor, 7,342 square feet of residential space on the second floor and 7,216 square feet of residential space on the third floor. The development is proposed for the property located at the northeast corner of New York Avenue and Northridge Street.

Among the nine variances Renaissance has requested, the main focus appears to be parking relief for 25 spaces that will not be provided in the proposal. The plan, under town code, calls for 55 parking spots.

Thomas Abbate, the attorney representing Renaissance, said each residential floor will feature eight one-bedroom apartments, stressing that they will not have a “cookie-cutter appearance.”

Jim McGoldrick, of Huntington Station, said the influx of apartments could bring in younger people who are not looking to purchase houses.

“If you clean it up, maybe the crime rates will go down and attract more people,” he said.

Amanda Peppard, owner of furniture store Suite Pieces, voiced her approval for the project. Her shop, which opened in 2012, is in between both this development, as well as the proposed Gateway Plaza.

“We’re definitely for the variances that they’re looking for,” she said. “We’ve tried to be an anchor for this revitalization that is about to happen.”

She added that an influx of new residents could help existing businesses, as well as possibly create draw new business.

Michael Rivera, of Huntington, said he is opposed to the project. Rivera, who lives nearby on Park Avenue.

He contested that the scope of the project should remain within the designated “parking criteria.”

In regards to parking, Peppard noted that the nearby municipal lots typically are open and would adequately supplement the provided parking.

The matters were eventually tabled by ZBA Chairman Christopher Modelewski, who said a SEQRA review must first be coordinated.