Public Hearing Set For Platt’s Zone Change

By Andrew Wroblewski

awroblewski@longislandergroup.com

 

Developer Dominick Mavellia was granted a public hearing for a proposed zone change necessary to build the building rendered above, at the east corner of East Main Street and Park Avenue in Huntington.

Developer Dominick Mavellia was granted a public hearing for a proposed zone change necessary to build the building rendered above, at the east corner of East Main Street and Park Avenue in Huntington.

Huntington Town Board members on Tuesday unanimously approved the scheduling of a public hearing to consider adopting a zone change for a historic Huntington property.

The east corner of the Route 25A and Park Avenue intersection – perhaps best known as the former location of Platt’s Tavern, where George Washington once dined – could be the site of a 10,000 square-foot medical office building to be built by developer Dominick Mavellia. A public hearing to consider a necessary zone change – from R-15 residence district to C-4 general business district – will be held by the town board on June 9 at 7 p.m.

“I have positive expectations… We’re going forward with our plan,” Mavellia said. “We’ve worked hard on this design and we’re proud of the building.”

Despite what Mavellia said have been several redesigns, the building – which would house tenant North Shore-LIJ and sub-tenant GoHealth Urgent Care – has drawn some disapproval from residents since its proposal in March. Local preservationists have argued that the building does not fit the aesthetics of the historic “Woodhull Corner.”

Mavellia, however, maintains that the design plans for the building adopt an 18th century feel and accommodate a life-size statue of George Washington and his horse.

Mavellia also dispelled what he said were public misconceptions of the project. First, he pointed out, that the roofline for the proposed building stands at 30 feet, not 50 feet, and is consistent with most two-story houses. Second, he said, the building would only account for 25 percent of the total land parcel, which would include what is now Park Avenue Deli, whose owner has said he’s agreed to sell if Mavellia’s plan moves forward.

“There has also been reference that the building on the property should be a museum,” Mavellia said. “I beg to differ. Huntington has several museums… and they all rely heavily on public donations; they’re struggling to stay open.”

With his proposal, he said, Mavellia believes that, with the construction process requiring several hires and North Shore-LIJ being one of the area’s biggest employers, the project could bring prosperity to the area.

“There would be a lot of good coming out of this project,” he said. “Certainly, if we’re turned down, I don’t know what will happen; currently, the property is an eyesore.”

The corner is currently home to a building that once served as a gas station, but it has not been operational for several years.