Developer Plans Subdivision Of 5.6-Acre Halesite Property

The structure that currently stands at 1 Noyes Lane in Halesite is slated to be demolished with plans to subdivide the 5.6-acre property into eight lots. Long Islander News Photo/Connor Beach

The structure that currently stands at 1 Noyes Lane in Halesite is slated to be demolished with plans to subdivide the 5.6-acre property into eight lots. Long Islander News Photo/Connor Beach

By Connor Beach
cbeach@longislandergroup.com

The Huntington Planning Board heard the introduction for a subdivision project at Noyes Lane in Halesite during its more recent meeting.

Plans to create the Noyes Lane Estates call for the subdivision of the 5.6-acre property, currently located at 1 Noyes Lane in Halesite, into eight residential lots ranging in size from 0.3 acres to just over one acre, according to preliminary maps.

The property is owned by Amityville-based Halesite Homes LLC. The land is zoned residentially, according to Richard Rauff, the company’s project manager.

“We are dividing it in a way that is well under the density that we are entitled to on the property,” Rauff said at the Nov. 1 meeting. “There is also a lot of property that is being designated as conservation areas that will never be built on.”

In addition to the conservation areas set aside in the development plans, the town-owned George Brush Preserve borders the northern side of the property. The area around the proposed subdivision has steep slopes, which Rauff said will provide for a more appealing design and give at least four of the lots a view of Huntington Harbor.

The plans also call for the construction of a cul de sac, to be called Jeanne Marie Court, to provide access to the new lots from Noyes Lane.

The structure currently standing on the property will be demolished, Rauff said.

“We are currently in the process of getting our disconnects from PSEG, National Grid and Suffolk County Water to clear the way for us to demolish that structure,” Rauff said.

The property is bounded by residential properties on its eastern, western and southern sides, and Rauff said he has started and plans to continue speaking with homeowners in the area.

“I’ve had some conversations with two or three of them, and I plan over the weekend to be personally involved in reaching out to the people that would be most affected and try to answer any questions they may have,” he added.

Rauff said the eight-lot yield has already been approved, and that a public hearing is scheduled for the Wednesday, Nov. 15 planning board meeting to discuss the site plan.

He added, “Folks have the opportunity to go to the public hearing and voice their opinion, and any questions they have we would be more than happy to answer.”