Housing Planned For Historic Nursery Site In Huntington

  Oakwood Road Nursery in Huntington, could be nearing the end of its 50-year run as its owners have filed a subdivision plan for the property with the Huntington Planning Department.   (Long Islander News photo/Connor Beach)

Oakwood Road Nursery in Huntington, could be nearing the end of its 50-year run as its owners have filed a subdivision plan for the property with the Huntington Planning Department. (Long Islander News photo/Connor Beach)

By Connor Beach
cbeach@longislandergroup.com

A historic Huntington nursery could be approaching the end its 50-year run.

Robert and Donna Bemiss, owners of the 223 Oakwood Road nursery, have submitted to the town planning department a residential subdivision application that, if approved, would eventually lead the Bemisses to close the operation.

The plans, submitted in April, call for a four-lot subdivision on the site, which spans 2.6 acres just south of Woodchuck Hollow Road.

The nursery’s garden center and a historic, 1.5-story residence, as well as several other accessory buildings, are currently found on the property.

The proposed subdivision would create four residential lots on the property. Three of the lots, at .66, .61 and .53 acres, would each house a new residential dwelling, according to plans.

The fourth lot, at .8 acres, would contain the existing 1.5-story, three-family dwelling, which was designated as a historic landmark by the Huntington Town Board in 2004. The lot also has another existing 1.5-story building that’s planned to be used as a two-car garage and storage space.

The three smaller lots would access Oakwood Road via a private driveway.

Plans provide the eight parking spaces required by town code for the three-family dwelling.

Robert Bemiss, reached for comment Wednesday, said there are no imminent plans to close the nursery, but that if the subdivision is approved it will “ultimately” take the place of the nursery. When asked, he declined to elaborate on why the Bemisses are looking to close the nursery.

The nursery’s website says it grows “thousands of perennials and hundreds of roses” and that it also has a “huge selection of unusual trees, shrubs and evergreens.” The nursery also carries a selection of herbs, locally-grown vegetables, annuals in hanging baskets, planters and all size containers and exotics, according to the website.

The subdivision application is scheduled to go before the Huntington Planning Board at town hall for a public hearing on June 27, 7 p.m.