Ravagh Challenges Patrons’ Palates

By Tes Silverman

info@longislandergroup.com

 

 Ravagh owner Matt Tazari displays kebob platter (jujeh kebob, koobideh kebob and barg kebob) with basmati rice.

Ravagh owner Matt Tazari displays kebob platter (jujeh kebob, koobideh kebob and barg kebob) with basmati rice.

Ravagh’s Persian Grill is a family-owned Middle Eastern restaurant with roots stretching back to New York City. Since its inception about 20 years ago, four more locations, including one on Main Street in Huntington village, have been established.

Owner Matt Tazari opened Huntington’s Ravagh in February 2011 to continue his family’s Iranian culinary traditions. This Persian restaurant has no reservations against creating unusual and flavorful dishes through the use of fruits such as sour cherries and currants, as well as spices like turmeric and saffron meant to challenge patrons’ palates.

 “Good food and good service doesn’t matter if there is no consistency in quality,” Tazari said. “Our aim is to create a dining experience where quality is optimal.”

To start off, the kashk bademjan (cooked eggplant in tomato sauce topped with yogurt, $6 lunch/$7 dinner) has a tangy taste, complemented by the yogurt. The sambuseh (crispy fried dumplings with chickpeas and herbs, served with spicy chutney, $6) is crispy and light and the Traditional kashk-bademjan (sautéed eggplant mixed with kashk [whey], topped with sautéed onions, $7/$7.50) may seem heavy, but is actually surprisingly light.

  The kashk bademjan consists of cooked eggplant in tomato sauce topped with yogurt.

The kashk bademjan consists of cooked eggplant in tomato sauce topped with yogurt.

 Sambuseh, crispy fried dumplings with chickpeas and herbs, served with spicy chutney.

Sambuseh, crispy fried dumplings with chickpeas and herbs, served with spicy chutney.

  Kashk bademjan, sauteed eggplant over kashk with sauteed onion, is among Ravagh's offerings.

Kashk bademjan, sauteed eggplant over kashk with sauteed onion, is among Ravagh's offerings.

For entrees, kebobs are the most popular and Ravagh has a variety to choose from. The jujeh kebob (cornish game hen in lemon-saffron marinade, $12/$15) is delicately seasoned with a hint of its lemon flavors. The koobideh kebob (chopped beef, $11.50/$13.50) and barg kebob (marinated sirloin strips, $12/$15) are hearty, yet melt in your mouth.

Stews are just as popular and filling. The khoresh bademjan (chunks of boneless baby lamb leg with eggplant and tomato, $12/$16) is a hearty choice. For those who prefer chicken, the khoresh fesenjan (chicken with crushed walnuts, cooked in pomegranate sauce, $13/$16) is the dish to try.

No entree is served without choice of an interesting array of rice options.

Basmati rice is safe, but those feeling adventurous can try the Zereshk Polo (basmati rice with barberries, currants and saffron, $6) or Albaloo Polo (basmati rice with sweet and sour cherries, $6. If you prefer a different side, the mast khiar (yogurt with cucumber and mint, $5/$6) or torshi (mix of chopped pickled vegetables, $5/$5) may be for you.

Dessert may be too much after eating generous portions of this cuisine, but choices like baklava and rosewater and saffron ice cream, made in-house, may sway you to satisfy your sweet tooth