Local Boxers Duke It Out For Charity

By Jano Tantongco

jtantongco@longislandergroup.com

Tom “The Schorr Thing” Schorr, of South Huntington, takes a hit in his match against Dan “The Hit Man” Leverich.

Tom “The Schorr Thing” Schorr, of South Huntington, takes a hit in his match against Dan “The Hit Man” Leverich.

The Long Island Fight For Charity raised more than $100,000 for various charities on Monday in an event full of intense bouts and sportsmanship all around.

About 500 guests attended the U.S.A. Boxing-sanctioned event at the Hilton Long Island in Melville, which included various local food and drink samplings, auctions and a full-length bout between established amateur boxers in the halfway through the charity fights.

Among the fighters were several who live in and work in the Town of Huntington, including Dave “The Demolisher” Compitello. He’s from West Islip and works in Huntington as a manager for Servpro, which restores homes and businesses after fire, water and mold damage.

“It was probably the greatest adrenaline rush. We raised a ton of money for charity, we all really care about it,” Compitello said. “Anyone who’s got a thought, an inkling that wants to do this, do it. Push yourself to the limit, it’s all worth it.”

Compitello faced off against Ray “The Punisher” Rivera in an intense heavyweight match. Both fighters landed solid hits on each side for a strong showing. Each charity bout resulted in a tie.

“He hits like a ton of bricks, good lord,” Compitello said.

Another fighter from the town was Ron “The Mazzacutioner” Mazza, a chiropractor from Northport, who fought in last year’s event as well. In the field for 33 years, he is the owner and director of ChiroSport Rehabilitation Centers in Westbury, Farmingdale and Astoria, Queens.

Scott “The Gubes” Guber, of Dix Hills, came out of boxing retirement to fill in and put on his gloves once more. He’s a partner at national accounting firm BDO. He has served on the charity’s committee since 2006 and last fought in 2005 and 2008.

Joanne Hutchins, left, a Fight For Charity organizer and Long Islander News sales associate, gives boxer Scott “The Gubes” Guber, of Dix Hills, some tips in between matches.

Joanne Hutchins, left, a Fight For Charity organizer and Long Islander News sales associate, gives boxer Scott “The Gubes” Guber, of Dix Hills, some tips in between matches.

Tom “The Schorr Thing” Schorr, of South Huntington, serves as the project manager at W.J. Northridge Construction Corporation in Hauppauge. He first learned of the charity event from the former Huntington UFC gym.

Elena “Black Widow” Lardizzone also heard about the event through the former UFC gym. She’s a registered nurse at Winthrop University Hospital, specializing in direct patient care in the emergency room as well as chemotherapy. She wants to give a “fighting chance” for the less fortunate.

Gayatrri “Lady Gaya” Musraca, of South Huntington, is a lead quality assurance analyst at Broadridge Financial Solutions in Edgewood. She has been boxing for the last five years and hopes to dedicate her time to this “worthy cause.”

Community Chest co-founder Jamie Austin, also Long Islander News’ COO, thanks guests and boxers for making their mark in the charitable initiative.

Community Chest co-founder Jamie Austin, also Long Islander News’ COO, thanks guests and boxers for making their mark in the charitable initiative.

The charity event is run by Long Island Community Chest, a nonprofit which helps provide financial support for less fortunate individuals who have “exhausted all traditional means of help.” Community Chest was founded by Jamie Austin and Matt Silver in 2000, and so far it has distributed more than $1 million to various charities across Long Island, including Genesis School, Family Residence and Essential Enterprises.

Austin called it “another great battle” in their charitable efforts.

“We are proud of the boxers, they worked hard… they went into the ring to battle. They all came out victorious, and we are now charged and excited about recruiting boxers for 2017,” said Austin, who is also the CFO of Long Islander News.

For those interested in becoming a charity boxer, visit LIfightforcharity.org for more information.