Suozzi In Normandy Honors The Fallen

US. Rep. Tom Suozzi laid wreaths at the graves of local service members buried in the American Cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer, France, as part of a delegation marking the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

US. Rep. Tom Suozzi laid wreaths at the graves of local service members buried in the American Cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer, France, as part of a delegation marking the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

Rep. Tom Suozzi (D-Long Island, Queens) honored service members who made the ultimate sacrifice during a trip to Normandy, France to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Allied D-Day Invasion there. Suozzi and other members of a Congressional delegation paid tribute in ceremonies with President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron to honor those lost during the Battle of Normandy.

“This experience was truly sobering and humbling,” Suozzi said. “Seventy-five years later, the sacrifice made on the altar of Normandy must be remembered and revered. These brave souls demand that we earn the sacrifice they made by lifting up our freedom and our democracy and participating in our politics and government in a way that is more noble.”

While in Normandy, Suozzi visited the American Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer and paid his respects to the 21 soldiers from the 3rd Congressional District who are interred there. Suozzi laid wreaths at the grave of Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., son of President Theodore Roosevelt; at the graves of 15 soldiers; and at the “Tablets of the Missing,” which memorialize the five soldiers who are listed as missing in action.

At Roosevelt’s grave Suozzi said a prayer of thanksgiving and spread a handful of dirt he had brought with him from Sagamore Hill, Roosevelt’s childhood home in Oyster Bay. Roosevelt was, like his father, a Medal of Honor recipient.

“At age 56, General Roosevelt was the oldest soldier in the D-Day invasion and the only general to land by sea with the first wave of troops,” Suozzi said. “Using a cane due to arthritis, Gen. Roosevelt calmly urged his troops on amidst the incredible attacks. He survived D-Day but succumbed to a heart attack five weeks later.

“Years later, when Gen. Omar Bradley was asked, ‘what was the bravest thing you ever saw in your military career?’ he responded, ‘Ted Roosevelt on the beach in Normandy.’”

Suozzi also visited Sainte-Mère-Église, the first French village to be liberated by the Allies after D-Day. There he met the mayor, Jean Quétier, and presented him with a flag that flew over the US Capitol.

Sainte-Mere-Eglise’s relationship with Locust Valley.sparked the “sister city” movement.

Sainte-Mere-Eglise’s relationship with Locust Valley.sparked the “sister city” movement.

Sainte-Mère-Église is the sister city of Locust Valley, part of the congressman’s district. The relationship came about in 1944 when Life magazine ran a photo of the wife of the mayor of Ste-Mère-Église placing flowers on the grave of Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. The photo inspired Locust Valley residents to adopt the village as a “sister city.” They sent supplies to the war-ravaged village, and started a movement that would continue to grow.

Within a year, nearly 200 American cities had followed Locust Valley’s lead, adopting sister cities all over the world.

In 1956, President Eisenhower officially formed Sister Cities International.

Rep. Tom Suozzi, right, and Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, left, met with Susan Eisenhower who presented the congressmen with medals recognizing their efforts to promote the history of the Normandy invasion.

Rep. Tom Suozzi, right, and Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, left, met with Susan Eisenhower who presented the congressmen with medals recognizing their efforts to promote the history of the Normandy invasion.

Suozzi also visited the Normandy Institute, an international educational residence with a mission to foster understanding and inspiration from the historic events of D-Day. There he met with Susan Eisenhower, granddaughter of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who presented both Suozzi and Rep. Jeff Fortenberry with medals recognizing their efforts in promoting the history of D-Day and the Normandy Invasion.

THE FALLEN
The following service members from the Third Congressional District are interred at the American Cemetery, Colleville-sur-Mer, France.

Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., Oyster Bay, 4th Infantry Division
Pvt. Charles Byrnes, Hicksville, 116th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Pvt. Walter Dawiskiba, Locust Valley, 175th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division
Pvt. First Class Lawrence Hills, Huntington, 121st Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division

Pvt. Edmund Kawiecki, Port Washington, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
1st Lieut. Harry Koeppel, Locust Valley, 119th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division
Pvt. Walter Korrow, Jericho, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division
Pvt. First-Class Chester Nakelski, Port Washington, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division
Tech. Sgt. Walter Newman, Port Washington, 314th Infantry Regiment, 79th Infantry Division
Pvt. First-Class Chester Puchalski, Glen Head, 13 Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division
Pvt. First-Class James Rice, Great Neck, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division
Technician Fifth Grade Ralph Spiezia, Huntington Station, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Technician Fifth Grade Andrew Stuckey, Manhasset, 802nd Tank Destroyer Battalion
Technician Fifth Grade Kenneth Geiler, Queens Village, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division

Pvt. First-Class Rudolph Stalzer, Kings Park, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division
Tech. Sgt Igor Vassilieff, Great Neck, 1141st Engineer Combat Group

Tablets of the Missing
at American Cemetery, Colleville-sur-Mer, France

Lt. John Behrens, Whitestone, US Navy
Lt. JG Joseph Capelli, Whitestone, US Naval Reserves
Coxswain Edward De Bias, East Northport, US Naval Reserves
Pvt. Annella Miranda, Huntington, 749th Tank Battalion
Cpl. Gustave Norell, Hicksville, 749th Tank Battalion 

Elija Farm To Be Farmland Forever

The Town and County have acquired development rights Elija Farm in South Huntington guaranteeing it will remain undeveloped in perpetuity.

The Town and County have acquired development rights Elija Farm in South Huntington guaranteeing it will remain undeveloped in perpetuity.

By Peter Sloggatt
psloggatt@longislandergroup.com


Elijah Farm will be farmland in perpetuity.

Owners of the 6-1/2 acre farm in South Huntington are closing a deal for the town and county to jointly future purchase development rights for the property. The transaction will guarantee the farm will remain just that and not be sold for housing or otherwise developed.

The property was part of a 10-plus acre farm  owned by Larry Foglia and Heather Forest  who still live and farm on the remaining acreage. “Leftover hippies,” according to Foglia, the husband-wife team sold the larger portion to Elija Farm which leased another two acres and operates a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) project. The CSA provides employment to autistic adults.

Foglia’s father originally bought the farm in 1963 after moving from Nassau County. in addition to raising vegetables, the family specialized in growing perennial day lilies, and hostas for the floral industry. Foglia acquired the additional acreage more recently and switched from nursery to CSA.

Foglia consults on agriculture and environmental issues and his search for stewards to continue farming the land led him the Elija CSA which operates a larger farm in Levittown.

The Huntington town board last week approved a lot line change to separate the two properties. Funding for the purchase comes from the county’s 1/4-cent sales tax surcharge and Huntington’s environmental preservation fund.

“The goal was to preserve the property,”Foglia said. “Now it is farmland in perpetuity. M9IyI=

Apology to Gary Melius and OHEKA Castle

In our May 25th edition we incorrectly reported that Oheka Castle was being pushed into bankruptcy court. This suggestion was pointing out that the actions of the lender, LNR, could push a lesser entity in that direction. To be clear, this is not the case with Oheka. The castle is not in bankruptcy proceedings and is not in any danger of shutting down. We apologize to Oheka Castle and its owner, Gary Melius for the stress caused.

The Long Islander News reviewed the detailed court proceedings that indicates that LNR, the mortgage holder on the Castle, has an alleged history sharp business practices. As suggested in the cases cited in court filings, LNR utilizes methodologies that are questionable to obtain properties for their portfolios. LNR is owned by Starwood Properties, the hotel chain giant. By connecting the dots, it would suggest that Starwood could gain access to owning this world renowned historic property for a fraction of its worth. Our calls for an interview with LNR and Starwood were not answered.

The current state of affairs at Oheka, based on our review of accounting statements, has the Castle operating at peak efficiency and at a profit.

Our investigation took over 2 months and we reviewed the legal documents and interviewed key players. We will release the full story in this week’s edition of the Long Islander News.

 

Murderer’s Release Sparks Outrage

Lisa Solomon was murdered by her husband on Christmas Eve 1987. Her husband Matthew, convicted of the crime, was paroled earlier this month.

Lisa Solomon was murdered by her husband on Christmas Eve 1987. Her husband Matthew, convicted of the crime, was paroled earlier this month.

By Peter Sloggatt
psloggatt@longislandergroup.com

Matthew Solomon has been released from prison.

Solomon was convicted of murdering his newlywed wife on Christmas Eve, 1987. The couple had been married six weeks when he strangled her in their Huntington Station home, then dumped her body in a field off of Oakwood Road in Huntington. Though he initially reported her missing to police, Solomon became a suspect even as he led volunteer search efforts in frigid weather to find his missing wife.

Solomon was released from Otisville Correctional Center in upstate New York this month after serving 31 years of an 18-years-to-life prison sentence.

His release came after a state parole board approved what was his seventh application for parole, and prompted backlash from lawmakers and the family of the victim, the former Lisa Weaver.

Lisa Solomon’s cousin, Steven Klerk discovered her body in a plastic garbage bag during one of those frigid searches. He joined Republican lawmakers and Suffolk Police PBA officials at a May 16 press conference where they blasted what Senate Minority Leader John Flanagan called “a left leaning parole board” for releasing the convicted murderer and others who have recently been paroled.

Steven Klerk, who discovered the body of his murdered cousin Lisa Solomon stuffed in a garbage bag during a search her in 1987, speaks with Republican lawmakers at a press conference in support of their Victims Justice Agenda.

Steven Klerk, who discovered the body of his murdered cousin Lisa Solomon stuffed in a garbage bag during a search her in 1987, speaks with Republican lawmakers at a press conference in support of their Victims Justice Agenda.

“Some crimes are so heinous that they become seared in your memory and the murder of Lisa Solomon, a young woman with everything to live for, and who had just gotten married, is one of those events,” Flanagan said. “Matthew Solomon deceived the public when it turned out he threw a beautiful life away like garbage. He deserves to spend the rest of his life behind bars.”

Flanagan raised the alarm over parole granted to two inmates convicted of killing police officers.

“The New York State Parole Board has released a series of murderers, including Matthew Solomon, Judith Clark, who murdered two police officers and a security guard during the 1981 Brinks heist, and Herman Bell, a cop-killer,” Flanagan said in a statement.

“More and more we see a lack of consideration for people like Lisa’s family, those who hurt the most as a result of violent crime, and who are being completely ignored by the parole board... It is our responsibility to give victims a voice and to protect the public from people like Matthew Solomon who should never walk the streets again, as Lisa will never be able to do,” Flanagan continued.

Speaking on behalf of Lisa’s family members – who have opposed Matthew Solomon’s past applications for parole – Klerk said: “Democrats care more about criminals than victims and their families. Murderers and rapists are being released from New York State prisons to live among us under the guise of prison reform.”

Flanagan, the Senate Minority Leader, proposed his own brand of reform. He outlined the minority-proposed Victims Justice Agenda, a package of 11 bills proposed by eight Republican senators to stiffen sentencing and give families a greater voice in parole hearings, among other things.

The bills would impose a mandatory sentence of life without parole for first degree murder convictions or for repeat violent offenders; would require unanimous vote of the parole board to release an inmate; increases the minimum time before which an inmate turned down for parole may make a new application; and give interested parties greater opportunity for input on a parole hearing; among other things.

Guilty Plea In Village Sexual Assault

Daniel Adum pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a 16-year-old girl in Huntington last November.

Daniel Adum pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a 16-year-old girl in Huntington last November.

By Peter Sloggatt
psloggatt@longislandergroup.com

A Huntington man pleaded to sexually assaulting a teenage girl in a downtown parking lot last November, Suffolk District Attorney Tim Sini said.

Daniel Adum, 19, pleaded guilty on Wednesday to several felony sexual assault charges and a misdemeanor charge of endangering the welfare of a child and is expected to receive a sentence of 15 years in prison at sentencing set for July 2.

The crime had rocked the Huntington community for its brazenness. Following Adum’s arrest the following day, Suffolk Police Commissioner Geraldine Hart said Adum, an Ecuadorian national with legal resident status, appeared to be “on the prowl” prior to the attack.

Suffolk Chief of Detectives Gerard Gigante said Adum passed the victim and a female friend, walking on Main Street.

The girls began to “pick up the pace” after they noticed the suspect had “exposed himself,” Hart said.

When they turned the corner from Main Street onto Prospect Street, Gigante said, Adum attacked them from behind. He hit his victim in the head, knocked her to the ground and sexually assaulted her. The friend ran for help, according to Gigante.

Hart said surveillance footage captured the attack, as well as the suspect leaving in a white Honda Civic with a black stripe.

The car was spotted by police the next night on New York Avenue in Huntington. The car was pulled over and Adum arrested.

“Surveillance video was critically important to solving this case, along with excellent police work,” Sini said in a release. “The defendant is now facing significant time in prison for this heinous act where he will no longer be a threat to women or to the Huntington community.”

Adum pleaded guilty before Acting Suffolk County Court Judge Karen M. Wilutis. Under the plea deal he is expected to receive a sentence of 15 years in prison at sentencing scheduled for July 2, Sini said.

Hearing Set For Expanded Hotel Plan

Developers plan to use the Old Huntington Town Hall building at the corner of Main Street and Stewart Avenue in Huntington village in an 80-room hotel.  Long islander news photo/Connor Beach

Developers plan to use the Old Huntington Town Hall building at the corner of Main Street and Stewart Avenue in Huntington village in an 80-room hotel. Long islander news photo/Connor Beach

By Connor Beach
cbeach@longislandergroup.com

New plans to turn the historic Old Town Hall building in Huntington village into a boutique hotel call for as many as 80 rooms up from 55 in previous renditions of the proposal.

The Huntington town board last month scheduled a public hearing in June to consider including in an existing Historic Building Overlay zoning district a parcel on land east of the Old Town Hall on the corner of Main Street and Stewart Avenue in Huntington village. The property was recently included in plans for the proposed hotel by Holtsville-based developer Huntington Village Hotel Partners.

The Historic Building Overlay District is designed to help preserve buildings of historic significance by giving owners of these properties the ability to use them in “purposes other than those permitted as-of-right in the zoning districts where such buildings are located,” according to town code.

Plans for the hotel were originally submitted to the town in 2013 by developer Emerson J. Dobbs through Huntington-based Old Town Hall Operating Co. Those plans were approved and called for the existing two-and-a-half-story structure to be preserved as the hotel’s lobby, lounge and meeting rooms. A 55-room guest wing was planned for the rear of the building.

The town approved Dobb’s plans, but he did not obtain a valid building permit in connection with the project before the imposed five-year deadline, according to town documents.

Seen from the back, the old town hall building is fenced while the developer’s plans advance.  Long islander News photo/Connor Beach

Seen from the back, the old town hall building is fenced while the developer’s plans advance. Long islander News photo/Connor Beach

Town documents show the new plans submitted by Huntington Village Hotel Partners, the company Dobbs is in talks with to sell the property, include the 1,742-square-foot property just east of the Old Town Hall building. The plans would require the demolition of the building next to the Old Town Hall that previously served as the town’s jail and police building.

Huntington Village Hotel Partners’ plan would still maintain the historic Town Hall building as the hotel’s lobby and common space. Parking for the hotel would be housed under the 80-room guest wing in the rear of the property.

Huntington Village Hotel Partners could not be reached for comment.

Huntington Supervisor Chad Lupinacci, who sponsored the resolution for the public hearing, said the proposed hotel would “bring renewed life to this historic landmark, preserving Huntington’s history and boosting our downtown economy.”

“Huntington village has always been a destination and the idea of a boutique hotel that pays homage to the building’s past life as the former Town Hall will achieve those goals while bringing the added convenience and comfort of an overnight stay,” Lupinacci said.

The public hearing to expand the Historic Building Overlay District is scheduled for 7 p.m., June 18 at town hall.

14 Apartments Planned Near Train Station

Plans submitted by developer Grant Havasy call for the construction of a mixed-use apartment building next to this existing building on the corner of New York Avenue and Northridge Street in Huntington Station.

Plans submitted by developer Grant Havasy call for the construction of a mixed-use apartment building next to this existing building on the corner of New York Avenue and Northridge Street in Huntington Station.

By Connor Beach
cbeach@longislandergroup.com

A developer is looking to construct a 14-unit apartment building on the corner of Northridge Street and New York Avenue near the Huntington train station.

Plans submitted to the Huntington planning department show Huntington-based developer Grant Havasy is looking to construct a 12,481-square-foot, mixed-use building with 14 apartments on the second and third floors.

The property for the proposed building is across Northridge Street from the Northridge building, the first phase of Renaissance Downtowns’ Huntington Station revitalization project, and directly adjacent to an existing two-story building with nine-apartments, which is also owned by Havasy.

The proposed 14-unit building is not part of the Renaissance Downtowns master development project.

Havasy is managing partner of Blue and Gold Holdings, the company responsible for constructing the Northridge building. Havasy’s Woodbury-based attorney Thomas Abbate said at last week’s planning board meeting the Northridge building is “virtually the only structure that has been erected as part of the Huntington Station revitalization.”

Plans show the new apartment building would include 2,985 square feet of commercial space on the first floor. The second and third floors would share a combined 9,496 square feet of residential space.

Planning officials said at last week’s meeting plans call for a “mezzanine area” below the second and third floors that would hold 12 parking spaces. The steep slope from the rear of the property towards New York Avenue would make the mezzanine parking area possible, planning officials said.

Plans call for an additional outdoor 14-space parking lot behind the building.

Abbate said the design of the building “complies with all respects of the off-street parking requirement” in the C-6 zoning district by providing all parking for the building on-site.

Planning officials said the proposal would require a number of variances from the Huntington Zoning Board of Appeals, including for the proposed indoor parking lot and because the second and third floor residential areas are larger than the footprint of the commercial space on the ground floor.

Abbate said at the meeting he would also need to convince the ZBA that the parking mezzanine does not make the building four stories.

The application was not listed on the May 2 ZBA agenda as of deadline Wednesday. The next ZBA meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m., May 9 at town hall.

Mount Misery Road-Inspired Movie Release Set

Directors and actors Chuck and Karolina Morrongiello bring the legends of Mount Misery Road to life in the new horror film “Amityville: Mt. Misery Road,” set for nationwide release on May 7.

Directors and actors Chuck and Karolina Morrongiello bring the legends of Mount Misery Road to life in the new horror film “Amityville: Mt. Misery Road,” set for nationwide release on May 7.

By Sophia Ricco
sricco@longislandergroup.com

The myths of Mount Misery road are making their film debut in an independent thriller based on the history and legends of West Hills’ woods.

Generations can recall hearing stories of a Hellhound, Mothman and an asylum patient named Mary stalking through the woods at night. Some have even braved journeying the woods themselves.

 “Amityville: Mt. Misery Road” has all the frightening elements to raise goosebumps and leave audiences cringing. But this horror flick is based on history.

“I grew up in this area and had always heard about Mount Misery Road,” Chuck Morrongiello said. “The other day, we were at a local get-together and heard grandparents talking about it. Then their kids discussed it and even their grandchildren knew about it.”

In the film, the Morrongiello and his wife Karolina play the parts of Floridian ghost-enthusiasts Charlie and Buzi who are intrigued when a friend captures images of floating orbs. Eager to get spooked, they venture into the woods and find much more than they anticipated.

“It was called a ‘love romp’,” Chuck said. “It’s a romp of a couple that’s just in love, we’re happy, shiny, and full of this energy. And we don’t really what about what’s going happen.”

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“Amityville: Mt. Misery Road” will be released nationwide by ITN Film Distribution on May 7.

“Amityville: Mt. Misery Road” will be released nationwide by ITN Film Distribution on May 7.

Filmed on location with the woods providing an eerie backdrop, “the movie is gloomy, dark, and it feels spooky,” Karolina said. “It’s fiction, but the road and there being legends about it are true.”

“We’re excited about this movie, we think it’s gonna be a homerun,” Chuck said. “We got a great distributor behind us.”

“Amityville: Mt. Misery Road” will be released nationwide by ITN Film Distribution on May 7, available on DVD at Walmart.

Uber Driver Pleads Guilty In Death Of Teen

Danyal Cheema of Huntington Station, left, pleaded guilty to second-degree manslaughter after a 15-year-old passenger fell while car-surfing and later died from his injuries. Photo/Suffolk DA

Danyal Cheema of Huntington Station, left, pleaded guilty to second-degree manslaughter after a 15-year-old passenger fell while car-surfing and later died from his injuries.Photo/Suffolk DA

By Connor Beach
cbeach@longislandergroup.com

An Uber driver who was at the wheel when a Cold Spring Harbor teen fell off the roof of his car in September pleaded guilty to second-degree manslaughter last week.

Suffolk prosecutors said Danyal Cheema, 24, of Huntington Station entered the plea on April 18 at the state Supreme Court building in Central Islip.

Cheema was working as an Uber driver when he picked up three boys, including 15-year-old Ryan Mullen, in his 2010 Toyota Highlander just after midnight on Sept. 23, 2018.

While Cheema was driving the teens to a house in Huntington, prosecutors said they asked Cheema for permission to “car surf” on the roof of his car while it was moving.

After initially offering him $70 cash, the passengers ultimately paid Cheema $40 and he allowed them to climb onto the roof of the vehicle while stopped at an intersection on Cove Road in Huntington, prosecutors said. Two of the teens rode on the roof of the SUV while the third captured a video of the incident on Snapchat.

Mullen, a student at St. Anthony’s High School, fell off of the vehicle as it was moving and hit his head on the roadway.

Prosecutors said Ryan Mullens died at home as a result of injuries sustained in the fall from the Uber’s roof.

Prosecutors said Ryan Mullens died at home as a result of injuries sustained in the fall from the Uber’s roof.

Prosecutors said the teens got back in the car and Cheema drove them the rest of the way to their destination, where Mullen later died in his sleep from “severe head trauma.”

“This was a tragic incident that could have been avoided had the defendant not conducted himself in such a reckless manner,” Suffolk District Attorney Tim Sini said.

In a statement through their attorney, Ryan’s parents Janice and Matthew Mullen said they welcomed Cheema’s guilty plea and would continue to grow the “Strive for Five” foundation they have established to honor Ryan’s memory.

Cheema faces a minimum of 10 months in prison plus five years of post-release supervision when he is sentenced by Suffolk County Acting Supreme Court Justice Fernando Camacho. Prosecutors said he will be sentenced at a later date.

Chief Commends Officer's "Extraordinary Restraint"

Village police arrested a Northport man who confronted two officers holding a shotgun and a knife.  Northport Ville PD photos

Village police arrested a Northport man who confronted two officers holding a shotgun and a knife. Northport Ville PD photos

By Connor Beach
cbeach@longislandergroup.com

A Northport man was arrested last week after he pointed a loaded gun at officers during a tense standoff, according to Northport police.

Police said officers were called to a tenant dispute at around 11:45 p.m., April 18 in a building with multiple apartments at 149 Fort Salonga Road in the Village of Northport.

The first officer to arrive spoke with the complainant, who police say was bleeding from the mouth. The victim told officers Logan Arens, who lives in the basement apartment, had punched him in the face, according to police.
Two Northport officers headed for the basement stairs to find Arens, and as they opened the basement door the officers encountered Arens coming up the stairs with a rifle in his left hand and a butcher knife in his right, according to police.

Police said Arens, 22, pointed the rifle up the stairs at the lead officer who drew his service weapon and ordered the suspect to drop the gun, which authorities later identified as a .22-caliber rifle that was loaded with one round in the chamber and eight in the magazine. Arens hesitated momentarily, but did drop the gun, according to police.

The officer then ordered Arens to drop the knife, and after four commands he finally put the knife down, police said. He was taken into custody without further incident.

“This is a situation that very well may have ended much differently,” Northport Police Chief Bill Ricca said. “The officer used an extraordinary amount of restraint and brought it to a conclusion without a tragic outcome.”

Police charged Arens with menacing a police officer, second-degree harassment and two counts of fourth-degree criminal procession of a weapon. He was arraigned in Northport Village Court and released on $5,000 bail. He is due back in court this week.