$15K Donation Will Help Link Veterans With Dogs

 Pictured, from left, are: Lynne Schoepfer, trainer, Paws of War; Nassau Executive Edward Mangano; Gabriela D’Arrigo, marketing and communications director, D’Arrigo Brothers of NY; Dori Scofield, co-founder of Paws of War; and U.S. Navy Veteran Rob Carrozzo and his dog, Lucy.

Pictured, from left, are: Lynne Schoepfer, trainer, Paws of War; Nassau Executive Edward Mangano; Gabriela D’Arrigo, marketing and communications director, D’Arrigo Brothers of NY; Dori Scofield, co-founder of Paws of War; and U.S. Navy Veteran Rob Carrozzo and his dog, Lucy.

D’Arrigo Brothers, one of the nation’s largest distributors of fresh fruits and vegetables, recently presented a $15,000 check to Paws of War to underwrite the cost of training service dogs to assist veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.                      

Nassau Executive Edward Mangano, who joined members of the 69th Infantry Regiment at the Museum of American Armor last Wednesday for the presentation, said Nassau is “most appreciative of the work that Paws of War does by providing support dogs to our veterans.”

Mangano continued, “This provides them needed assistance to help them cope with war related issues which they are dealing with. However, Paws of War can’t do it alone. It is vital that corporate citizens follow the generous example of D’Arrigo Brothers of New York and lend a helping hand.”

The D’Arrigo Brothers’ donation will help Paws of War to identify veterans and match them with a dog that will meet their needs and assist in their treatment and rehabilitation. Veterans meet their dogs, who then undergo an intensive training program administered and supervised by the experts at Paws of War.

Of 750,000 veterans who served in Afghanistan and Iraq, approximately 100,000 sought mental health care, according to the Department of Veteran Affairs. Half of those were diagnosed with PTSD.

Veterans Affairs’ statistics show that, nationwide, more than 20 veterans a day commit suicide. In 2014, the latest year for which data is available, more than 7,400 veterans took their own lives, accounting for 18 percent of all suicides in America. Researchers say that the risk of suicide for veterans is 21 percent higher when compared to civilian adults.