Zone Change Needed For Planned Dix Hills Senior Center

By Jano Tantongco

jtantongco@longislandergroup.com

The proposed 166-unit Brightview Senior Living senior assisted-living facility would be built across 10 acres of land spanning three parcels on Deer Park Avenue in Dix Hills, north of Talisman Drive, and south of the Park Shore Preschool and Kindergarten.

The proposed 166-unit Brightview Senior Living senior assisted-living facility would be built across 10 acres of land spanning three parcels on Deer Park Avenue in Dix Hills, north of Talisman Drive, and south of the Park Shore Preschool and Kindergarten.

A proposal to construct a 174,557-square-foot senior assisted-living facility with 166 apartments on Deer Park Avenue in Dix Hills requires a zone change from the Huntington Town Board.

The proposed Brightview Senior Living center would be built upon 10 acres that is currently home to Bella Casa Floral Design and Bissett Nursery just north of Talisman Drive, and south of the Park Shore Preschool and Kindergarten. In order to move forward, the developer requires an R-40 residential to R-HS residential health services zone change.

The proposal, which would be three stories at its maximum height, plans show, would be built across three existing parcels. Plans require a building height variance be approved since only two stories are permitted within the R-HS zoning designation.

The plan also calls for a new sewage treatment to be erected on-site. There would be 110 parking spaces and four loading spaces provided, which exceeds the parking requirements designated by town code.

David Holland, vice president of development for Baltimore-based The Shelter Group, the developer of the proposal, said in a statement emailed June 9 that the proposal would benefit seniors in the area, including with “housing, hospitality services and personal care.”

When asked about population density on the property, Holland said the proposal “is comparable to other assisted living communities in Huntington Township on a per acre basis.”

“The community will be a quiet residential use with minimal traffic generation,” he added.

According to Craig Turner, principal planner for the Huntington Planning Department, the developer had not yet submitted several documents for review to the town as of deadline Monday. The missing documents include a traffic study, soil testing information, a topographic map of the entire lot, and a visual impact analysis.

“We ask for it as part of our review, but it doesn’t need to be submitted as part of the hearing,” Turner said.

A longtime resident of the area, Gail Jospa, took issue with this during the town board’s June 7 meeting.

“All the documentation has not even been submitted to planning, which is just ludicrous,” Jospa, who lives directly across from the site on Tiana Place, said during the meeting’s public portion. “The entire community has a right to have access as to what is being proposed.”

Jospa also asked the board to reconsider the scheduling of an upcoming public hearing on the proposal -- which will be at 2 p.m. on July 12 at Huntington Town Hall. She requested the hearing be delayed until September so that the hearing would be held at night instead of the afternoon, potentially drawing bigger community participation.

Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone responded and said the board had agreed to keep the scheduled July 12 hearing as per its executive session. Councilwoman Susan Berland, however, voted down the scheduling in an effort to accommodate Jospa’s request. But the hearing date was approved 4-1 nonetheless.